40 Astounding Examples of Abstract Photography

I just love the creativity we see in abstract photography. I love it when a photographer takes an otherwise ordinary shot and shoots it at just the right angle or focus to create a masterpiece of colors, patterns and textures. With abstract photography there is only one rule and that rule is there are no rules. Rules for composition and proper focus don’t really apply.

Here are some great examples of abstract photography to inspire you to go out and create your next work of art. Enjoy.

Patricia Sweeney

Abstract Photography



Earl A. Jones

Abstract Photography



tanakawho

Abstract Photography



somebody3121

Abstract Photography



kit

Abstract Photography



damyan

Abstract Photography



RamonaG

Abstract Photography



gnato

Abstract Photography



eintoern

Abstract Photography



beckerpecker

Abstract Photography


Alexandre Buisse

Abstract Photography



Tineke Visscher

Abstract Photography



hesitation

Abstract Photography



Philipp Klinger

Abstract Photography



jciv

Abstract Photography



Alice Marie

Abstract Photography



acukur

Abstract Photography



Thomas Holtkoetter

Abstract Photography



Beppe02

Abstract Photography



Coeiise

Abstract Photography


les flynn

Abstract Photography



Alan Jaras

Abstract Photography



Stefan Hellkvist

Abstract Photography



Daniel Swann

Abstract Photography



Carlos Costa Branco

Abstract Photography



DodgeNBurn

Abstract Photography



dojoh

Abstract Photography



Marinshe

Abstract Photography



designalicious

Abstract Photography



(nz)dave

Abstract Photography


jmvnoos

Abstract Photography



Jacob Jovelou

Abstract Photography



Ursula I Abresch

Abstract Photography



pedroinacio

Abstract Photography



LuceAnima

Abstract Photography



dismorfic

Abstract Photography



Jeremy Brooks

Abstract Photography



David M Lee

Abstract Photography



Niels Christian Wulff

Abstract Photography



Erika Nagy

Abstract Photography



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Comments

  1. says

    the pics are really stunning..the somebody3121 is the best abstract pic just cant make out its waves or a painting..amazing photography…the best thing in abstract photography is its vry simple n even an amature can take good abstract pics..The abstract photographer uses his creative imagination to create stunning works of art. water & sand best subjects for abstract photography if the usage of lights are proper in it..

  2. says

    These are so beautiful and inspiring, everything on this site is. I used to really be into photography, especially the abstract. I miss those days, I want to get back into them now. These are great photos.

    – J

  3. Chris says

    I cannot see any abstraction here. I can only see some good macro lens work and well thought out composition. Surely, if a picture is to be considered an abstraction, what is photographed should not be immediately apparent. I think Michael Kenna put it best when he said something like a photographer should resist the temptation to become a slave to technical know how; a fascination with getting the right aperture, exposure setting as opposed to a fascination with the subject matter. There is far too much of the former in this selection of images. This, of course does not mean that they display a lack of skill. Finally, please do not take my comments as a negative criticism, but plain speaking art-criticism.

  4. says

    These are really nice images, but only some of them are actually abstracts. As another commentor noted, several of these are just close-up photos or architectural photos. Dayman, Hestiation, Philipp Klinger, Jciv, Alice Marie, Acukur, Beppe02, Jmvnoos, Dismorfic, and Jeremy Brooks are not abstract. They’re very, very pretty images, but they’re not abstracts.

  5. says

    All I can say Chris is that you are totally off the mark with your comments.

    These images are an excellent display of both skill and abstract prowess.

    Well done I say!

    I am personally taking some inspiration from these images!

  6. bitton says

    sir, i am from Nepal and jst want to learn the tipical abstract photoggraphy. i saw ur collection and it gave me lots of ideas but i need ur help. please learn me that how to creat picture in ur mind.

  7. says

    I agree this is a nice collection of images, but many of them aren’t true abstracts. If you can readily identify the subject matter of a photo, it isn’t abstract. For this reason, I’ve found abstract photography to be very challenging and highly addicting. Thanks for your post!

  8. Chris says

    In my original post I stated a reason why I think that these pictures are ‘not’ abstracts (a decision which I continue to uphold, yet perhaps it requires some further elaboration). However, I think True North makes a useful comment when he/she underlines the potential for inspiration. I think it is laudable that so many people have been inspired to go away and work on their photographic style after seeing the pictures on this page.

    Nonetheless, I also think in terms of understanding these images, abstraction (as a description, term, concept) is unhelpful or even harmful to inspiration. Take Uta Barth for example, her work may be more accurately entitled as abstract because in her work, the subject is an aspect of her work that is indiscernible (or unrecognizable). In these images, whilst it may be occasionally difficult to make out what is being photographed, great care is taken not to disrupt the form or line of that which is being photographed. So long as – as a photographer – you pay attention to the form of what you are photographing, how can you call your work abstract? The most useful thing to remember about abstraction – in art – is that it is a moving away from the familiar. So that a close up of a aspect of a fork cannot be called abstract because even though I have not seen a fork in this way before, I still know it is a fork that I am looking at. Perhaps then the remedy is to – when approaching abstraction – forget what you are looking at; don’t think “how can I photograph the water in such a way that it will look unusual or different” but try instead: “how can I make this look unfamiliar?” This may sound like me simplifying things but I am sure you will join me shouting out loud, “Its just not that simple!” And you would be absolutely spot on. Its not simple at all.

  9. danielle says

    there are some very similar and some not so similar, they’re all inspiring and abstract in there own way. well done :)

  10. says

    These are GREAT! I do light writing abstracts, but should probably do more abstracts like this.

    I’m new at this, and the light writing is fun. Check my site out! I know you will like them!

  11. john landasan says

    yeah that’s true..that’s why I invited my classmates and friends to see these photos and even them don’t know what picture do they pick to give their favors because all were fascinating…:)

  12. mohd says

    Wow! These photos are so beautiful and artistic. i wonder how the photographers took it. Wish i could it too

  13. Chris says

    These photographs are clever, but not abstract. For anything to be abstract it must be unrecognisable. They are certainly clever though; excellent use of macro, lighting, patient framing. I applaud any instance where a creation inspires positively but that should not be at the expense of our knowledge of what constitutes an abstract; you would not call Uta Barth a landscape photographer…

  14. says

    The images are stunning to look at ,but they are generally close-up images of something in front of the camera, mostly architecture I suspect. They are still snapshots.

    To understand what I mean as abstract photography, visit tom4photos.com. These are anti-still photographs. Many people try this type of imagery by drawing with their camera, but for them it is a brief experimental episode until they return to still photography, probably dur to peer pressure. I have done anti-still photography for 30 years and have over 700 in collections. I don’t crop my images or use photoshop to change them. And they are not photograms or based on any other darkroom, Man Ray bullshit.

    I define photography as an image made with light. Most photographs, like the above collection, are made with reflected light, using a very still camera. Since I have been attracted to movement for most of my life,, drawing with a camera is very natural. Creating my anti-still photographs is my enjoyment of movement. Tom

  15. says

    The images are stunning to look at, but they are generally close-up images of something in front of the camera, mostly architecture I suspect. They are still snapshots.

    To understand what I mean by abstract photography, visit tom4photos.com. These are anti-still photographs. Many people try this type of imagery by drawing with their camera, but for them it is a brief experimental episode, until they return to still photography, probably due to peer pressure. I have done anti-still photography for 30 years and have over 700 in collections. I don’t crop my images or use photoshop to change them. And they are not photograms or based on any other darkroom, Man Ray, bullshit.

    I define photography as an image made with light. Most photographs, like the above collection, are made with reflected light, using a very still camera. Since I have been attracted to movement for most of my life, drawing with a camera and using direct light, is very natural. The camera is moving, the lights are still. No flashlight drawings either. Creating my anti-still photographs results from my enjoyment of moving my hands and arms, sometimes my entire body.

    My favorite saying — Still photography is like sex without foreplay. Tom

  16. says

    Thanks for a wonderful “exhibition”! Really enjoyed it and will re-visit.
    Certainly, some of the images are close-ups of recognisable objects, but so what! Thanks from Cape Town!

  17. Eze OBULOR says

    Beautiful will even be an understatement in describing these photos. I have been greatly inspired that am going to immediately start creating mine.

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