26 Inspiring Examples of iPhone Photography

Our readers submitted some great shots taken with their iPhone. Enjoy the collection below and let us know your favorites.

Urban Angel

iPhone Photography

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toon_ee

iPhone Photography

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toon_ee

iPhone Photography

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jordan parks

iPhone Photography

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james_drury

iPhone Photography

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ahmer_inam

iPhone Photography

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Susan Tuttle

iPhone Photography

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toon_ee

iPhone Photography

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james_drury

iPhone Photography

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shirley319

iPhone Photography

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landry_kabul

iPhone Photography

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Adriana Glackin

iPhone Photography

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michmutters

iPhone Photography

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Jeff Palacios

iPhone Photography

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skyoctane

iPhone Photography

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Edwin Rovers

iPhone Photography

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Paul Shears

iPhone Photography

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jeffphodges

iPhone Photography

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optiklenz13

iPhone Photography

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Adam.Lem

iPhone Photography

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harrydee3

iPhone Photography

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optiklenz13

iPhone Photography

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Urban Angel

iPhone Photography

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Susan Tuttle

iPhone Photography

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Adriana Glackin

iPhone Photography

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james_drury

iPhone Photography

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  • Kaimi sorout

    SPEACHLESS…

  • ZZ

    It’s not so much “photography” anymore than it is digital manipulation. You don’t need to know anything abut lighting at all–or anything for that matter.

    Just make the sky dark in PS, shoot at a contorted angle, and poof–”photography.” The proof is in the iPhone.

    “Photography” as art has always been viewed as a “mid-level” art form, but is now on a similar level as needlepoint–boring to the creative, but keeps the masses busy doing tasks that no one really cares about.

    When I go to “Arts” shows now, the only people really interested in the photography displays are, well, not really anyone. The displays are virtually empty of viewers.

    And why shouldn’t it be that way? After all, anyone with an iPhone is a photographer, which means we reach a saturation point that makes “photography” about as interesting as eating a taco.

    Imagine if virtually anyone could pick up a guitar and play a song that was virtually as good as any “artist.” Musicians and good music would be considered everyday and ho hum.

    The same thing will happen to authors and writing when anyone can input specific parameters for a novel and have a Photoshop-like program write it, and write it as well as any author can. Photography was just easier for machines to do than the latter, so far.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/onkel_wart/ Thomas Lieser

    great collection.

    (makes me want to get an iphone asap)

  • http://www.flickr.com/optiklenz13 Ash

    Thanks for the feature!!

  • Casie

    These photos are really amazing

  • Jane

    Very awesome photos love the depth of field and the lighting there all amazing.

  • http://www.susantuttlephotography.com Susan Tuttle

    Thank you so much for including my work! I’m loving the compilation of images — very inspiring!

  • Jan

    I think what ZZ said, is well put. This new technology takes us farther and faster away from what we are use to. And maybe this is where the crux lies.
    I work as a photographer mainly using ProDSLR, but also an old Hasselblad with film… BUT I also get great results with my iPhone. Do only thing I can say is that they give you totally different results, but – when it comes to taking photos of people – they react totally different if I hold up my old Hasselblad or my iPhone in front of them.

  • Didier

    I can only recommend reading “Iphone Obsessed” by Dan Marcolina where he reviews tens of post processing apps and opens new horizon for iphone pictures.

  • http://rolling-webdesign.com Theo

    Great post, love iphoneography! Join instagram you`ll find me under theocb.

  • http://www.kedr.com.au KedR

    These are amazing. I just bought a HTC one X and it has a 2.0 8mp camera and I am amazed at it’s results. Wish I could upload a few to you fellow photographers.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003406052574 Melody

    Amy, Wayne and I have absolutely loved wahnitcg you grow with your photography (and as a Mom of course) When I talk to anyone about your photos I always tell them that I’ve never seen anyone better, professional or otherwise. You just have a wonderful gift for seeing just the right picture at just the right time. We are so proud of you for how far you’ve come, just keep going girl, you can DO it all! Love you, Sandy

  • Mark Graski

    Reply to ZZ,
    The camera is a tool, nothing more.
    It does not matter what kind of camera you use because the creativity is in the photographer not the camera.
    Look at MichMutters “fork” or Skyoctane “Parrot”.
    Are these photos less credible because they were photographed with an iphone ?. Are the images less credible because they are digital images ?.
    No, the images speak for themselves and represent the work of the photographer, not the camera.

  • Bill Jones

    @Mark
    Well said.

  • http://www.sabinamiklowitzphotography.com Sabina Miklowitz

    I apologize for what will inevitably be interpreted as self-promotion… but I’ve been doing some abstract architectural photography on my iPad with the help of apps such as Mirrorgram and Glitché, and I’m quite happy with them. If anyone’s interested: http://www.flickr.com/photos/eggshells/sets/72157635143125843/

    I used to poo-poo iPhoneography because I resented that people could apply a pretty Instagram filter to a picture of their coffee foam art and claim to be “photographers”… but I’ve since come to the conclusion that an iPhone is just a tool, like a camera, and even though there are easy apps that that will transform something awful into something at least mediocre, you still have to have an eye in order to make it art. You still have to have a good sense of composition, and even when it comes to apps, you have to know how to use them effectively (just like Photoshop, but simpler) in order to get something good.

  • Kevin Prichard

    Clearly it’s the subject matter, as chosen by these photographers, that makes these photos good -nothing to do with the camera, which just happens to be an iPhone in this case.

    The underlying point should be: if you’re carrying an iPhone, and you’ve got an eye for composition, lighting, color etc., you, too, can take good photos. Same goes for the wide variety of Android mobiles, and the many various pocket cameras from many various makers,

  • Photon Fondue

    So tired of the same old drone about iphones turning everyone into photographers. Yes, they do – and why not. Who said art belongs only to the domain of those who can afford a high-end SLR or DSLR. Thank you Apple for bringing folk-art to the masses. Are all iphone photographers good? – no. Are all DSLR photogrpahers good? – no. Most currently published photography is clichéd shots of clichéd subject matter but if someone gets a kick out of that why call the cops. What I AM surprised about is that specially promoted shots, as above, include clichés. But that’s down to the eye (and awareness) of the article author.

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